The Link Between Chronic Pain and Insomnia

chronic pain insomniaThe following guest article was written by Katrina Rice.

Anyone who suffers from chronic pain from health issues like rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis knows the drastic effects it has on their way of living – whether it be restricted mobility, increased medical expenses or reduced social life, accomplishing tasks seem to become quite unbearable every single day. And at night, sleep is disrupted due to the aching hips, back, knees and legs.

According to medical experts, arthritis sufferers are highly likely to suffer from insomnia as well. But recent studies show that restless nights and arthritis symptoms are a “two-way street” problem. Chronic pain can lead to a lack of sleep, and sleep deprivation can make chronic pain worse.

Doctors have recently become more focused on treating insomnia to improve the health conditions of patients suffering from chronic pain. One important note to remember is pain and insomnia work in a cycle. According to Professor Alan Silman, a medical director of Arthritis Research UK, “Pain induces insomnia and insomnia induces pain”.

Arthritis and Insomnia

Osteoarthritis is the wear and tear or degradation of bone tissues whereas rheumatoid arthritis is when the immune system attacks the joints. Much of the pain patients feel is due to the inflammatory responses of their body whenever it travels to their joints. It is fully understood by experts that disrupted sleep does increase the number of inflammatory markers and further aggravates the joints.

Inflammatory compounds in the body play a vital role in sleep disturbance. This disturbance will then alter the natural cycle of hormones in the body and affect the underlying levels of inflammation. Other cytokines (pro-inflammatory messengers) may also be involved in this activity. While insomnia releases more damaging inflammatory chemicals in the body, it also means the body misses out on the opportunity to heal when sleeping. After all, sleep is the longest time when the body is at rest and has low inflammation levels. So it is really the best time for the damaged cells to heal.

Effects Of Sleep Deprivation On Chronic Pain

The most notable effect of sleep loss in chronic pain is the low production of growth hormones. The growth hormone is vital in many body processes including cell development, weight regulation of the body and tissue repair, as well as replacement of collagen and bone cells. Though the growth hormone is released in the body at any time of the day, the biggest bursts come from the moment our bodies fall into deep sleep. But if deep sleep is not achieved, the body may not produce enough growth hormones. Furthermore, lack of sleep makes patient irritable and weary – this makes them even more sensitive to pain.

There are a number of treatments and alternative remedies that can be used to help ease the pain, but NSAIDs are usually prescribed for those who experience severe pain. Other forms of treatment come in natural supplements like glucosamine, chondroitin and curcumin supplements.  Patients with osteoarthritis usually choose glucosamine, but curcumin pills are also becoming more popular among arthritis patients. As for side effects, you can easily search reviews and testimonials in Google.

The bottomline is that chronic pain sufferers are stuck in a vicious cycle and they need to get out of it. In order to help them increase their pain threshold and reduce chronic inflammation, getting enough rest is a must. Here are six tips to use to help achieve a good night’s sleep.

  • Avoid taking afternoon naps. No matter how much you want to rest, it only gives you more energy in the evening. Keep yourself occupied when you start feeling sleepy in the afternoon.
  • Use lamps with warm light instead of ceiling lights. Warm lights have a soothing effect and can help you feel calmer and sleepier.
  • Avoid coffee, tea or any caffeinated products after 3:00 p.m., and never drink alcohol after 9:00 p.m.
  • Keep your waking and bed time consistent every day. This helps your biological clock get used to the routine and will eventually follow that pattern on its own.
  • Eliminate midnight snacking.
  • Do not gain weight, and instead, try to lose more pounds. Excess body fat can put more pressure on your joints. Gaining more weight means your fat cells will expand and your body will eventually start producing more cytokines – a fuel for inflammation.

Katrina Rice is a mom and a freelance writer. She strongly believes in the concept of holistic wellness through healthy and natural living, traveling and immersing one’s self in new activities. A self-proclaimed health enthusiast, she hopes to inspire more people to turn to natural treatments in addressing health issues.

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Thomas Cohn, MD

Interventional pain doctor helping Minnesotans manage back, neck, foot, and other pain. Board-certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation with additional board-certification in pain management from the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA), the American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians (ABIPP) and the American Board of Pain Medicine (ABPM).

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