Spinal Cord Stimulation For Chronic Back Pain

Pain is something that can quickly take over our lives. Pain can lead us to be more emotional and less empathetic with family and friends. It can hinder our ability to do things that make us feel better, such as exercise. It can take away our earning potential if we are unable to work because of the pain. In other words, pain can upend what you do and who you are.

And chronic pain like back or leg pain can be particularly overwhelming. It’s different than pain in an extremity like a finger or toe; leg or back pain starts in one spot and can radiate elsewhere and be unrelenting.

Many people start with traditional medicine such as pills or doctor visits, but those may have limited impact. They may also try natural healing, but again—the person may determine how effective those are. One treatment that works for many is spinal cord stimulation; this graphic explains what it is and how it might help.

What Is Spinal Cord Stimulation?

Spinal cord stimulation is a safe and relatively effective treatment option for certain individuals suffering from chronic back or leg pain. Roughly 80 percent of individuals who undergo SCS experience some form of relief, whether it be in the form of decreased pain, a reduction in the need for opioids or better sleep quality.

Our friends at PainInjuryRelief.com recently reached out to us with an infographic about spinal cord stimulation and asked if we’d be interested in sharing it with our readers. We are always happy to discuss new technologies and potential treatment options, so we’ve included it below. Check it out if you believe spinal cord stimulation may be something that you could benefit from.

Block Pain and Get Back to Your Life with Spinal Cord Stimulation
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Thomas Cohn, MD

Interventional pain doctor helping Minnesotans manage back, neck, foot, and other pain. Board-certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation with additional board-certification in pain management from the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA), the American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians (ABIPP) and the American Board of Pain Medicine (ABPM).

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