5 Things People With Chronic Pain Want You To Know

chronic pain knowLiving with chronic pain is difficult enough before you add in the stigma you have to deal with from other people. Hopefully your friends and family members are sympathetic to your condition, but even they don’t fully understand what you’re going through. Today, we want to share five things that people with chronic pain want you to know about their condition.

What We Want You To Know

Here are five things that patients with chronic conditions wish others knew about their condition.

We don’t want to be in pain

This may sound obvious, but sometimes people think individuals are just playing up their pain to get attention. Trust me, they’d trade all the attention in the world if they could live a pain free life. If they are talking about their pain, it’s because they want you to try and understand what they’re going through, not because they are craving attention.

Just because we don’t show it, doesn’t mean we’re not in pain

We put on a brave face and go about our daily life, but just because we’re smiling doesn’t mean we’re not in pain. Chronic pain patients often try to mask their pain because they don’t want to be seen as weak or injured, and some are great at hiding their pain. But that doesn’t mean we don’t feel it with each step.

Keep reaching out

It’s impossible to predict when a flareup is going to occur, so if we say we can’t make it out to the mall or we cancel on movie plans at the last minute, we’re not trying to avoid you. We’re just dealing with a lot of pain and we’d be miserable, but we love that you’re reaching out. Keep texting and calling us, because we really do want to hang out. Don’t assume that we’re intentionally trying to avoid you, because we’re not.

We’re not in it for the drugs

We don’t want to be taking pain pills, but sometimes they are the only thing that makes it bearable to get through our physical therapy session. We’re not just popping pills and hoping the problem gets better, we’re actively working towards finding a solution through a combination of therapy techniques.

We’re not lazy

What’s easy for some is a huge burden to others. When chronic pain is at it’s worst, even getting out of bed in the morning can be difficult. Again, we’d trade anything for the chance to live without constant pain, but life doesn’t work like that. We’re not using chronic pain as a way to get out of work or doing chores. We’re trying our best, even if it doesn’t look like it.

Overprescribing Opioids Is A Problem In Our Own Backyard

opioid problems mnNew findings published in the Annals of Surgery suggests that clinicians at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester were routinely writing opioid prescriptions for surgical patients that exceeded regulatory guidelines currently being drafted by the state of Minnesota. The findings also uncovered significant differences in opioid prescribing among the Mayo clinics in Rochester, Arizona and Florida, as well as within surgical procedures.

Study senior author Elizabeth Habermann, who also serves as the scientific director of surgical outcomes research at Mayo, said the findings help highlight where improvements can be made.

“In light of the opioid epidemic, physicians across the country know overprescribing is a problem, and they know there is an opportunity to improve,” said senior author Elizabeth Habermann, scientific director of surgical outcomes research at Mayo. “This is the first step in determining what is optimal for certain surgeries and, eventually, the individual patient.”

Opioid Overdoses In America

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of deaths involving prescription opioid overdoses have nearly quadrupled since 2000. In fact, more than 90 people died each day from either a prescription opioid or heroin overdose in 2015 alone.

Study co-author Dr. Robert Cima said doctors have been so focused on ensuring patients have their pain minimized as much as possible after surgery that they often don’t consider the possible long-term side effects of the prescriptions they’re filling.

“For the last two decades, there had been such a focus at the national level on ensuring patients have no pain,” said Dr. Cima, a colorectal surgeon and chair of surgical quality at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. “That causes overprescribing, and, now, we’re seeing the negative effects of that.”

I have no doubt that the Mayo Clinic will adhere to the new guidelines being drafted at the state level in short order, but this story speaks to the larger issue of just how unregulated opioids are at some of the nation’s best hospitals. And if it’s happening there, you can bet it’s happening to a larger degree at lesser care centers.

However, these findings do cast light on the problem and should help push us towards a solution, but it’s not necessarily going to come from the top down. It needs to start with doctors. We need take time with each patient and push them towards active treatment techniques instead of passive treatments like opioids. Opioids certainly have their role in pain management, but they shouldn’t be over-relied on, as it appears they are.

Why Are We Treating Pain The Same As We Did During The Civil War?

civil war painIt is no secret that there is an opioid problem in the United States. It seems like there is a new report being published every week on the problems with opioids in this country. This week the government published data on the number of emergency room visits related to opioid use in a single year.

The data shows roughly a 100 percent increase in the last ten years in the number of hospital visits and admissions related to opioid problems. Not surprising is that despite some differences from state to state, in general, the problem affects everyone equally – male and female, rich and poor – just like any other addiction. The focus of most data being published is on opioid addiction. Unfortunately, rarely is someone talking about some of the reasons behind the problem, especially as it relates to how the United States treats pain.

How The US Treats Pain

It is really no surprise that there is an opioid problem in the United States. Pain is a very complex set of medical issues, but unlike diabetes or cancer, very little money has been spent on any aspect of pain as a medical problem, and medical school and physician training in understanding and managing pain is virtually nonexistent. Research sponsored by any government or industry sources is minimal compared to all other areas, maybe 2 percent of all money spent by the National Institute of Health and there is no comprehensive strategy to look at treating pain. Most importantly, the tools used to treat pain are the same tools we used at the time of Civil War – opioids. Most other diseases from hypertension to diabetes and cancer over the last fifty years have seen major advancements in how we treat these conditions, but not pain.

On top of the publishing of new data of how many people are being affected by opioids, the news media is full of sensational information on every aspect of the opioid epidemic. Time magazine this week had information on how drug companies and drug treatment centers are profiting from opioid problems. One of the biggest lobbying groups for money and guidelines on opioids are addiction specialists and drug treatment centers; just a slight conflict of interest. Then the sensational news moves to all the individuals who have become addicts and the problems of addicts. Unfortunately, opioid addiction and how it affects individual lives is not really significantly different from other addictions from food to alcohol, it’s just less glamorous. The latest highlight in the news is the potent drugs and overdoses, and how just touching some of these illegal drugs or using for the first time can cause overdoses.

Opioids are a problem in the United States and more data does not help solve the problem – it just makes it sensational. The real issue that is being ignored is the issue behind opioids and how we treat pain. Most of the pain treatments available date back to before the Civil War. Pain is extremely complex, and to solve the opioid issue the United States needs to get serious about finding better pain management tools and invest in them.

Spinal Cord Stimulation For Chronic Back Pain

Pain is something that can quickly take over our lives. Pain can lead us to be more emotional and less empathetic with family and friends. It can hinder our ability to do things that make us feel better, such as exercise. It can take away our earning potential if we are unable to work because of the pain. In other words, pain can upend what you do and who you are.

And chronic pain like back or leg pain can be particularly overwhelming. It’s different than pain in an extremity like a finger or toe; leg or back pain starts in one spot and can radiate elsewhere and be unrelenting.

Many people start with traditional medicine such as pills or doctor visits, but those may have limited impact. They may also try natural healing, but again—the person may determine how effective those are. One treatment that works for many is spinal cord stimulation; this graphic explains what it is and how it might help.

What Is Spinal Cord Stimulation?

Spinal cord stimulation is a safe and relatively effective treatment option for certain individuals suffering from chronic back or leg pain. Roughly 80 percent of individuals who undergo SCS experience some form of relief, whether it be in the form of decreased pain, a reduction in the need for opioids or better sleep quality.

Our friends at PainInjuryRelief.com recently reached out to us with an infographic about spinal cord stimulation and asked if we’d be interested in sharing it with our readers. We are always happy to discuss new technologies and potential treatment options, so we’ve included it below. Check it out if you believe spinal cord stimulation may be something that you could benefit from.

Block Pain and Get Back to Your Life with Spinal Cord Stimulation

The Science Behind Brain Development

Your brain is the most complex organ in your entire body, and we are always striving to learn more about how it develops and the way it interacts with our body. Many people suffering from chronic pain are battling this condition due to a misfiring synapse in the brain or an issue in how the organ interprets signals it receives from other areas of our body.

Recently, a colleague from overseas at Sofia Medical University reached out after coming across the blog. He was interested in what we had written about the brain and its role in chronic pain interpretation. He asked if we would be interested in sharing an infographic that he developed that dives deeper into how our brain develops as we age. I believe it is a thought-provoking and informative visual guide, so I was more than happy to share it on the blog.

So please, check out the infographic below to learn more about the science behind our brain’s development.

Human Brain Development