Overprescribing Opioids Is A Problem In Our Own Backyard

opioid problems mnNew findings published in the Annals of Surgery suggests that clinicians at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester were routinely writing opioid prescriptions for surgical patients that exceeded regulatory guidelines currently being drafted by the state of Minnesota. The findings also uncovered significant differences in opioid prescribing among the Mayo clinics in Rochester, Arizona and Florida, as well as within surgical procedures.

Study senior author Elizabeth Habermann, who also serves as the scientific director of surgical outcomes research at Mayo, said the findings help highlight where improvements can be made.

“In light of the opioid epidemic, physicians across the country know overprescribing is a problem, and they know there is an opportunity to improve,” said senior author Elizabeth Habermann, scientific director of surgical outcomes research at Mayo. “This is the first step in determining what is optimal for certain surgeries and, eventually, the individual patient.”

Opioid Overdoses In America

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of deaths involving prescription opioid overdoses have nearly quadrupled since 2000. In fact, more than 90 people died each day from either a prescription opioid or heroin overdose in 2015 alone.

Study co-author Dr. Robert Cima said doctors have been so focused on ensuring patients have their pain minimized as much as possible after surgery that they often don’t consider the possible long-term side effects of the prescriptions they’re filling.

“For the last two decades, there had been such a focus at the national level on ensuring patients have no pain,” said Dr. Cima, a colorectal surgeon and chair of surgical quality at Mayo Clinic’s Rochester campus. “That causes overprescribing, and, now, we’re seeing the negative effects of that.”

I have no doubt that the Mayo Clinic will adhere to the new guidelines being drafted at the state level in short order, but this story speaks to the larger issue of just how unregulated opioids are at some of the nation’s best hospitals. And if it’s happening there, you can bet it’s happening to a larger degree at lesser care centers.

However, these findings do cast light on the problem and should help push us towards a solution, but it’s not necessarily going to come from the top down. It needs to start with doctors. We need take time with each patient and push them towards active treatment techniques instead of passive treatments like opioids. Opioids certainly have their role in pain management, but they shouldn’t be over-relied on, as it appears they are.

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Thomas Cohn, MD

Interventional pain doctor helping Minnesotans manage back, neck, foot, and other pain. Board-certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation with additional board-certification in pain management from the American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA), the American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians (ABIPP) and the American Board of Pain Medicine (ABPM).